Thank you for participating in the Citizen Science survey!

The information you provided will help us create an ideal citizen science web site where people can learn about, participate in, and contribute to science through informal, recreational activities as well as formal research efforts.

The heart of this web site will be a first-of-its-kind extensive database-driven listing of hundreds of existing citizen scientist programs and activities. In the interim, we’ll be listing projects in a searchable format here on the Science Cheerleader.

We’d love to hear from you so email us with suggestions as well as citizen science projects you think we should include in the  Project Finder.  

Cheers!

  • Kraemer

    Cheerleader,

    I am glad to see you promoting science using your experiences and gifts, you also understand the need and obviously know how to promote things in an intelligent and organized way.

    The survey was a good idea, but it seemed to assume (by questions and listed resources) that most citizen science enthsiasts are focused on natural history and natural science. There are still some of us who do chemistry and try to split hyperfine spectra in their basements.

    I appreciate the experience you gained with Discover, but I have to admit that I rarely even look at it now-a-days. The science seems to be often colored by ideology. I don’t mind efforts to popularize, but I think that excessive ideolgy is dishonest and leads people to mis-understand how science works. The history of science has often overthrown ideolgies – something I would never expect from Discover magazine. This is more likely with lead articles. For that reason I find myself reading the more professional journals on the topics that interest me.

    On the other hand, in my incomplete look at the Cheerleader site, I think that Darlene is more intereted in encouraging people to learn, know and do science than in promoting certain ideologies. Thank-you.

    TK

  • Kraemer

    Cheerleader,

    I am glad to see you promoting science using your experiences and gifts, you also understand the need and obviously know how to promote things in an intelligent and organized way.

    The survey was a good idea, but it seemed to assume (by questions and listed resources) that most citizen science enthsiasts are focused on natural history and natural science. There are still some of us who do chemistry and try to split hyperfine spectra in their basements.

    I appreciate the experience you gained with Discover, but I have to admit that I rarely even look at it now-a-days. The science seems to be often colored by ideology. I don’t mind efforts to popularize, but I think that excessive ideolgy is dishonest and leads people to mis-understand how science works. The history of science has often overthrown ideolgies – something I would never expect from Discover magazine. This is more likely with lead articles. For that reason I find myself reading the more professional journals on the topics that interest me.

    On the other hand, in my incomplete look at the Cheerleader site, I think that Darlene is more intereted in encouraging people to learn, know and do science than in promoting certain ideologies. Thank-you.

    TK

  • Michael Reed

    I have been enjoying the study of the natural world since I was small, and I like to perform some research and studies on some areas of the biological sciences. I hope that the “small” steps and discoveries of citizen scientists will be useful for God and mankind.

    Have fun and faith in God.

  • Michael Reed

    I have been enjoying the study of the natural world since I was small, and I like to perform some research and studies on some areas of the biological sciences. I hope that the “small” steps and discoveries of citizen scientists will be useful for God and mankind.

    Have fun and faith in God.