Science! Brought to you by the Tennessee Titans Cheerleaders

Watch as the Tennessee Titans Cheerleaders describe what Titan is and why it’s so cool. (Note: the girls speaking are current or soon-to-be scientists.) Thanks, girls! I appreciate your assistance in Making Science Cool! Next up: the 76ers Cheerleaders play a lead role in our Brain Makeover project.

 

  • Thanks for making this business so entertaining and, well, you know…

  • Thanks for making this business so entertaining and, well, you know…

  • Ivan3Man

    Nice to see a science blog from a female perspective. So, I have now added your blog to my RSS Feed.

    Regards, Ivan.

  • Ivan3Man

    Nice to see a science blog from a female perspective. So, I have now added your blog to my RSS Feed.

    Regards, Ivan.

  • Thanks, Ivan! I’ve got Sir Charles on my radar… 🙂

  • Thanks, Ivan! I’ve got Sir Charles on my radar… 🙂

  • Preston MacDougall

    Hi Darlene,
    I always tell my students that “C&E News is the Sports Illustrated of the chemical world”. Thanks to your very upbeat Internet endeavor, I can now also tell them, honestly, that it even has cheerleaders (and then refer them to your Web site).
    You might be interested to know that one of the best students in a chemistry class that I recently taught is also one of the Tennessee Titans cheerleaders. There is a nice new story about her at the link below. http://www.murfreesboropost.com/news.php?viewStory=14452
    Amazingly, there is another science whiz on the Titans cheerleading squad. I think Melissa is her name, but she is a biochemistry graduate student at Vanderbilt University. I don’t know her personally, however. Both young ladies are aiming to become physicians.
    I would like to make a suggestion for a citizen science project.- Do It Yourself Cancer Research. Actually, this project was started several years ago at Oxford University. Some details are at the Web sites below: http://www.chem.ox.ac.uk/curecancer.html
    http://www.yubanet.com/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi/59/32700
    When I did a piece on this during my regular commentary on the Nashville jazz-format NPR station, there was an excellent response, and a few newspapers later ran the story in print.
    Your Web site might be able to regenerate interest in this excellent “citizen science” project. I was told that the project was stopped because of funding constraints. If public interest were high enough, perhaps the project could be restarted.
    Your Web site also asks for “kitchen chemistry” ideas. You probably have already covered the “GAK reaction”, but if not, it is described in yet another of my commentaries (link below).
    http://www.sitnews.us/MacDougall/101305_macdougall.html

    Best of luck with your science cheerleading in 2009!

    Preston MacDougall

  • Preston MacDougall

    Hi Darlene,
    I always tell my students that “C&E News is the Sports Illustrated of the chemical world”. Thanks to your very upbeat Internet endeavor, I can now also tell them, honestly, that it even has cheerleaders (and then refer them to your Web site).
    You might be interested to know that one of the best students in a chemistry class that I recently taught is also one of the Tennessee Titans cheerleaders. There is a nice new story about her at the link below. http://www.murfreesboropost.com/news.php?viewStory=14452
    Amazingly, there is another science whiz on the Titans cheerleading squad. I think Melissa is her name, but she is a biochemistry graduate student at Vanderbilt University. I don’t know her personally, however. Both young ladies are aiming to become physicians.
    I would like to make a suggestion for a citizen science project.- Do It Yourself Cancer Research. Actually, this project was started several years ago at Oxford University. Some details are at the Web sites below: http://www.chem.ox.ac.uk/curecancer.html
    http://www.yubanet.com/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi/59/32700
    When I did a piece on this during my regular commentary on the Nashville jazz-format NPR station, there was an excellent response, and a few newspapers later ran the story in print.
    Your Web site might be able to regenerate interest in this excellent “citizen science” project. I was told that the project was stopped because of funding constraints. If public interest were high enough, perhaps the project could be restarted.
    Your Web site also asks for “kitchen chemistry” ideas. You probably have already covered the “GAK reaction”, but if not, it is described in yet another of my commentaries (link below).
    http://www.sitnews.us/MacDougall/101305_macdougall.html

    Best of luck with your science cheerleading in 2009!

    Preston MacDougall

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