The much anticipated launch of Brain Makeover.

What Everyone Needs to Know to Be Scientifically Literate

This evening at the SXSW festival in Austin,  I unveiled this Brain Makeover teaser video.

Physics Professor and author of “Science Matters,” James Trefil of George Mason University and the Philadelphia 76ers wants you to give it up for the key concepts in science that will help you be  “science literate,” pain-free! (Pssst: Only 7% of the adult American population are science literate*, and that includes all the scientists and engineers. *Why Science?, Teachers College Press, 11/1/97.)

To start your Brain Makeover,  you can click on any one of 18 soon-to-be-posted videos of the cheerleaders sharing the concept along with Professor Trefil’s explanation.

Coming soon: We’ll be posting a quiz created by Professor Trefil to test your knowledge of these 18 ideas. Score a passing grade (and someday, I’m going to), and you will win an “I’m a Science Literate!” certificate and a Science Cheerleader T-shirt!  You will also have, in Trefil’s words, the satisfaction of understanding “enough about the physical universe to deal with issues that come across our horizon, in the news or elsewhere.”

Stay tuned…you’ll be a science literate in no time!

  • That’s great! Looking forward to focusing on my studies…no, really. 😎

  • That’s great! Looking forward to focusing on my studies…no, really. 😎

  • Steve Duffy

    I had a great conversation with you this evening Darlene. I saw that I, along with a lot of people I assume, think of science as a kid’s endeavor. I think people, like myself, believe that kids need it but somehow, once you’ve grown up and have a real job, I suppose, that science is all over. It’s almost like science can’t be a hobby like singing or dancing…it’s either your job or you don’t do it at all. I used to love physics, still do, but don’t spend much time thinking about it because I’m trying to master my job. A worthwhile pursuit but not 100% fulfilling.

    I think what you’re doing is awesome because it’s a top down approach. Reinvigorating the child like wonder of “How does this universe work” in us so we can contribute and pass it on. Maybe more policy work needs to focus on this (I’ve got a graduate degree in public policy so I think about these things). What can we do now, with the resources we have, instead of thinking it has to wait until a future generation grows up, when it may be too late.

  • Steve Duffy

    I had a great conversation with you this evening Darlene. I saw that I, along with a lot of people I assume, think of science as a kid’s endeavor. I think people, like myself, believe that kids need it but somehow, once you’ve grown up and have a real job, I suppose, that science is all over. It’s almost like science can’t be a hobby like singing or dancing…it’s either your job or you don’t do it at all. I used to love physics, still do, but don’t spend much time thinking about it because I’m trying to master my job. A worthwhile pursuit but not 100% fulfilling.

    I think what you’re doing is awesome because it’s a top down approach. Reinvigorating the child like wonder of “How does this universe work” in us so we can contribute and pass it on. Maybe more policy work needs to focus on this (I’ve got a graduate degree in public policy so I think about these things). What can we do now, with the resources we have, instead of thinking it has to wait until a future generation grows up, when it may be too late.

  • JT Lewis

    Very timely, Science Cheerleader, given it is Brain Awareness Week! March 16-22

    http://www.sfn.org/baw/about.cfm

  • JT Lewis

    Very timely, Science Cheerleader, given it is Brain Awareness Week! March 16-22

    http://www.sfn.org/baw/about.cfm

  • jim

    “Electrons are atomic glue”. Cool beans.

  • jim

    “Electrons are atomic glue”. Cool beans.