Submit Your Ideas to Improve Government by March 19!

IdeaScale logo
IdeaScale logo

Got any bright ideas? The Federal government is looking for your suggestions on how it can achieve greater transparency and improve public participation in the decision-making process.  Now through March 19th, anyone can submit ideas for how to make agencies better, including suggestions for data that should be published online.

First, pick your favorite agency from the Open Government Dashboard. You’ll be taken to their Open Government page, where you can start the idea submission process. The Open Government pages all rely on the IdeaScale software, which provides a platform to suggest ideas, vote on those submitted by others, and watch the most important ideas bubble to the top.

My colleague at the Defense Department recently wrote an article, HOW TO: Submit Your Ideas for DoD’s Open Government Plan, which lays out a step-by-step guide to contributing to its Open Government Page. You should also check out the Open Gov Tracker, which creates a tally of how well each agency is engaging citizens.

This is a great opportunity to let the government know which science issues are most important to you. Make sure to get your ideas in by March 19!

  • JT Lewis

    For yet one more reason the Science Cheerleader’s work is critical, see NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF’s article on emerging research in environmental toxins:

    “Senator Lautenberg says that under existing law, of 80,000 chemicals registered in the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency has required safety testing of only 200. “Our children have become test subjects,” he noted.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/25/opinion/25kristof.html?em

  • JT Lewis

    For yet one more reason the Science Cheerleader’s work is critical, see NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF’s article on emerging research in environmental toxins:

    “Senator Lautenberg says that under existing law, of 80,000 chemicals registered in the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency has required safety testing of only 200. “Our children have become test subjects,” he noted.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/25/opinion/25kristof.html?em