Wescott’s Weekly Wrap-Up – the Science Blog Networks

David here again.  If you’ve been following the science blogosphere over the past few weeks, you’ve noticed a huge explosion in the number of new science blog networks out there – every one of them chock full of amazing content for scientists and non-scientists alike.    Here is my list of  places you can go online to find a veritable cornucopia of wholesome sciencey goodness.

Scienceblogs.com – Perhaps the first big science blog network, established by SEED Media.  It’s still the first place most people go to get outstanding science content, and it represent the network against which all others are judged.

Discover Blogs – from Discover magazine, where Darlene works.  This network offers writers whose bylines also appear in places like the New York Times and BBC.  They’ve also just launched a new aggregator to compile and share a ton of science news.

Scientopia – One of the new entries, apparently this network’s only goal is to have a place for science bloggers to do their thing, free from commercial interruptions.

Scientific American – one of the most storied “brands” in science writing has been online for some time now, and they’ve just recruited one of the top names in the online community to run their blog network.  I expect very big things from them.

Wired Science – some great “long-form” writers here and accomplished authors to learn about everything from dinosaur bones to “superbugs.”

PLoS blogs network – for a long time the Public Library of Science has worked hard to make science writing and research open and available to everyone.  Their commitment to accessibility just got kicked up a couple notches with the launch of their blog network –

Guardian Science Blogs – The storied British newspaper has earned a leg up on “mainstream” media in publishing not just one but a whole network of science blogs.   This is where I learned about  the Pew Research Centre (note the British spelling) report that says  science accounts for 10% of all stories on blogs but only 1% of the stories in mainstream media coverage.  Pretty soon there won’t be much of a difference between online and mainstream media anyway, but this makes you stop and think, doesn’t it?

Of course there are plenty of other places you can go to get great science content – places like Boing Boing (which has a new science editor) and Big Think (Darlene’s former boss is running the show there!).  I’m sure I’ll be sharing more from them in future weeks, but for now I think we should celebrate this very impressive display of activity from some of the world’s best science writers.  Enjoy!